◊(Local Yarn Code "Check-in [acdb5b41]")

Overview
Comment:Replace uses of undefined ‘cite’ tag with ‘attrib’
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk | errata
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA3-256: acdb5b41136440bdcb5ba9fa7c8f65a2993dac21595ef319eeb77a4ea8153741
User & Date: joel on 2020-05-04 02:04:19
Other Links: manifest | tags
Context
2020-05-10
21:36
Collect cache INSERTs in a transaction, delegate to a thread check-in: 187278e6 user: joel tags: trunk
2020-05-04
02:04
Replace uses of undefined ‘cite’ tag with ‘attrib’ check-in: acdb5b41 user: joel tags: trunk, errata
02:03
Add ‘Local Yarn Site Notes’ series check-in: b723c75d user: joel tags: trunk
Changes

Modified articles/future-proofing.poly.pm from [ff1f9fdf] to [ef22f2e9].

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◊note[#:date "2015-05-12"]{

◊blockquote{E-book backup is a physical, tangible, human readable copy of an electronically stored
novel. The purchased contents of an e-book reader were easily photocopied and clip-bound to create
a shelf-stable backup for the benefit of me, the book consumer. I can keep it on my bookshelf
without worry of remote recall. A second hardcover backup has been made with the help of an online
self-publishing house.

◊footer{◊link['eb]{Ebook backup} by Jesse England (◊link['rg]{via Roberto Greco})}

}

◊url['eb]{http://jesseengland.net/index.php?/project/e-book-backup/}
◊url['rg]{http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/118835221028/ebook-backup-jesse-england-2012-via}

}

◊note[#:date "2015-05-13"]{

◊blockquote{Unlike with other digital expressions, format is not the problem: HTML, CSS, and
backward-compatible web browsers will be with us forever. The problem is, authors pay for their own
hosting.

…Keeping your website active is probably the last thing your family will wish to focus on in their
grief. As they move on, attending to your digital affairs may not be high on their task list.

◊footer{Jeff Reifman, ◊link['wh]{Hosting Your Website After Your Death} }

}

◊url['wh]{https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/hosting-your-website-after-death--cms-23492}

}

◊note[#:date "2015-10-15"]{

................................................................................
patchwork of perpetual nowness.

You can’t count on the web, okay? It’s unstable. You have to know this. …If a sprawling Pulitzer
Prize-nominated feature in one of the nation’s oldest newspapers can disappear from the web,
anything can. “There are now no passive means of preserving digital information,” said Abby Rumsey,
a writer and digital historian. In other words if you want to save something online, you have to
decide to save it. Ephemerality is built into the very architecture of the web, which was intended
to be a messaging system, not a library.

◊footer{Adrienne LaFrance, ◊link['rtw]{Raiders of the Lost Web}}
◊url['rtw]{http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/10/raiders-of-the-lost-web/409210/}
}

I can envision only one sort-of-practical way the web can be “preserved” in any meaningful sense of
the word: a giant microfiche archive with a card index. Yes, it would be inconvenient to use. It’s
also the only option likely to be useable at all in 100 years.

}







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◊note[#:date "2015-05-12"]{

◊blockquote{E-book backup is a physical, tangible, human readable copy of an electronically stored
novel. The purchased contents of an e-book reader were easily photocopied and clip-bound to create
a shelf-stable backup for the benefit of me, the book consumer. I can keep it on my bookshelf
without worry of remote recall. A second hardcover backup has been made with the help of an online
self-publishing house.}attrib{◊link['eb]{Ebook backup} by Jesse England (◊link['rg]{via Roberto Greco})}



◊url['eb]{http://jesseengland.net/index.php?/project/e-book-backup/}
◊url['rg]{http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/118835221028/ebook-backup-jesse-england-2012-via}

}

◊note[#:date "2015-05-13"]{

◊blockquote{Unlike with other digital expressions, format is not the problem: HTML, CSS, and
backward-compatible web browsers will be with us forever. The problem is, authors pay for their own
hosting.

…Keeping your website active is probably the last thing your family will wish to focus on in their
grief. As they move on, attending to your digital affairs may not be high on their task list.}attrib{Jeff Reifman, ◊link['wh]{Hosting Your Website After Your Death} }



◊url['wh]{https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/hosting-your-website-after-death--cms-23492}

}

◊note[#:date "2015-10-15"]{

................................................................................
patchwork of perpetual nowness.

You can’t count on the web, okay? It’s unstable. You have to know this. …If a sprawling Pulitzer
Prize-nominated feature in one of the nation’s oldest newspapers can disappear from the web,
anything can. “There are now no passive means of preserving digital information,” said Abby Rumsey,
a writer and digital historian. In other words if you want to save something online, you have to
decide to save it. Ephemerality is built into the very architecture of the web, which was intended
to be a messaging system, not a library.}attrib{Adrienne LaFrance, ◊link['rtw]{Raiders of the Lost Web}}
◊url['rtw]{http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/10/raiders-of-the-lost-web/409210/}


I can envision only one sort-of-practical way the web can be “preserved” in any meaningful sense of
the word: a giant microfiche archive with a card index. Yes, it would be inconvenient to use. It’s
also the only option likely to be useable at all in 100 years.

}

Modified articles/jillettes-wipeout-test.poly.pm from [992b1767] to [a81169f2].

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◊(define-meta published "2011-12-16")

◊title{Jillette’s Wipeout Test}

◊blockquote{“If every trace of any single religion died out and nothing were passed on, it would
never be created exactly that way again. There might be some other nonsense in its place, but not
that exact nonsense. If all of science were wiped out, it would still be true and someone would find
a way to figure it all out again.”

◊footer{◊index[#:key "Jillette, Penn!book"]{Penn Jillette}, ◊link[1]{◊cite{God, No! Signs You May
Already Be an Atheist and Other Magical Tales}}◊fn[1]}}

We might call this the “◊index{wipeout test}”. It is true that no religion would pass it, and that
the laws of physical science probably would. But interestingly, this doesn’t actually say anything
about a religion’s value or truth. It just reflects that a religion is more purely◊fn[2] a product
of complex relationships between particular people.

I can illustrate this by applying the wipeout test to ◊index{Canadian Culture}, for example. If







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◊(define-meta published "2011-12-16")

◊title{Jillette’s Wipeout Test}

◊blockquote{“If every trace of any single religion died out and nothing were passed on, it would
never be created exactly that way again. There might be some other nonsense in its place, but not
that exact nonsense. If all of science were wiped out, it would still be true and someone would find
a way to figure it all out again.”}attrib{◊index[#:key "Jillette, Penn!book"]{Penn Jillette}, ◊link[1]{◊i{God, No! Signs You May
Already Be an Atheist and Other Magical Tales}}◊fn[1]}

We might call this the “◊index{wipeout test}”. It is true that no religion would pass it, and that
the laws of physical science probably would. But interestingly, this doesn’t actually say anything
about a religion’s value or truth. It just reflects that a religion is more purely◊fn[2] a product
of complex relationships between particular people.

I can illustrate this by applying the wipeout test to ◊index{Canadian Culture}, for example. If

Modified articles/pollen-targets.poly.pm from [07c372dd] to [9c97ede1].

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◊title{Pollen Targets}

I’ve been digging into Pollen. It’s early days yet, but it seems very promising. So I was surprised
and glad to see this happen today:

◊blockquote{◊link[1]{“New Pollen tutorial:} how to generate multiple outputs (e.g., HTML, plain text,
LaTeX, and PDF) from one source file.”

◊footer{Matthew Butterick (◊mono{@mbutterick}) in a now-deleted tweet}
◊url[1]{https://docs.racket-lang.org/pollen/fourth-tutorial.html}
}

I tweeted earlier today that this is probably the best web/writing news of the summer, if not the
year. Yes, that’s subjective. But anyhow, let me explain why I think it’s great.

For at least a few years now I’ve been trying to figure out how a good way to generate a web site
and a print-ready PDF book from the same source document (◊xref["future-proofing"]{because
reasons}). Before Pollen, the best route seemed to be: write the documents in ◊link[2]{Markdown},







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◊title{Pollen Targets}

I’ve been digging into Pollen. It’s early days yet, but it seems very promising. So I was surprised
and glad to see this happen today:

◊blockquote{◊link[1]{“New Pollen tutorial:} how to generate multiple outputs (e.g., HTML, plain text,
LaTeX, and PDF) from one source file.”}attrib{Matthew Butterick (◊mono{@mbutterick}) in a now-deleted tweet}
◊url[1]{https://docs.racket-lang.org/pollen/fourth-tutorial.html}


I tweeted earlier today that this is probably the best web/writing news of the summer, if not the
year. Yes, that’s subjective. But anyhow, let me explain why I think it’s great.

For at least a few years now I’ve been trying to figure out how a good way to generate a web site
and a print-ready PDF book from the same source document (◊xref["future-proofing"]{because
reasons}). Before Pollen, the best route seemed to be: write the documents in ◊link[2]{Markdown},

Modified articles/quote-arthur-longevity.poly.pm from [66f34586] to [e500913a].

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#lang pollen

◊; Copyright 2012–2018 by Joel Dueck. All Rights Reserved.

◊(define-meta published "2012-01-31")

◊blockquote{“I wish it longevity so that it might find shabbiness.”
◊footer{Arthur, on the occasion of Path’s launch, ◊link[1]{comparing new social networks to new
museums}.}}

◊url[1]{http://sexpigeon.tumblr.com/post/16729718345/path-puts-a-silly-amount-of-trust-in-its-avatars}

◊note[#:date "2018-11-11"]{Path did not achieve longevity or shabbiness:

◊blockquote{“On May 28, 2015, Path announced it had been acquired for an undisclosed amount by
Kakao.

“On September 17, 2018, Path ◊link[2]{announced} its termination of the service. From October 18,
2018, existing users are no longer able to access the Path service.”

◊footer{◊link[3]{◊i{Path (social network)}} on Wikipedia}}}

◊url[2]{http://blog.path.com/post/178172780707/the-last-goodbye}
◊url[3]{https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Path_(social_network)}






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#lang pollen

◊; Copyright 2012–2018 by Joel Dueck. All Rights Reserved.

◊(define-meta published "2012-01-31")

◊blockquote{“I wish it longevity so that it might find shabbiness.”}attrib{Arthur, on the occasion of Path’s launch, ◊link[1]{comparing new social networks to new
museums}.}

◊url[1]{http://sexpigeon.tumblr.com/post/16729718345/path-puts-a-silly-amount-of-trust-in-its-avatars}

◊note[#:date "2018-11-11"]{Path did not achieve longevity or shabbiness:

◊blockquote{“On May 28, 2015, Path announced it had been acquired for an undisclosed amount by
Kakao.

“On September 17, 2018, Path ◊link[2]{announced} its termination of the service. From October 18,
2018, existing users are no longer able to access the Path service.”}attrib{◊link[3]{◊i{Path (social network)}} on Wikipedia}}

◊url[2]{http://blog.path.com/post/178172780707/the-last-goodbye}
◊url[3]{https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Path_(social_network)}

Modified articles/quote-chesterton-humiliation.poly.pm from [144bc721] to [871f28f8].

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◊(define-meta published "2011-03-26")

◊blockquote{“He felt the full warmth of that pleasure from which the proud shut themselves out; the
pleasure which not only goes with humiliation, but which almost is humiliation. Men who have
◊index[#:key "drowning"]{escaped death by a hair} have it, and men whose love is returned by a woman
unexpectedly, and men whose sins are forgiven them. Everything his eye fell on it feasted on, not
aesthetically, but with a plain, jolly appetite as of a boy eating buns.” ◊footer{G.K. Chesterton,cite{The Ball and the Cross}}}







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◊(define-meta published "2011-03-26")

◊blockquote{“He felt the full warmth of that pleasure from which the proud shut themselves out; the
pleasure which not only goes with humiliation, but which almost is humiliation. Men who have
◊index[#:key "drowning"]{escaped death by a hair} have it, and men whose love is returned by a woman
unexpectedly, and men whose sins are forgiven them. Everything his eye fell on it feasted on, not
aesthetically, but with a plain, jolly appetite as of a boy eating buns.” }attrib{G.K. Chesterton, ◊i{The Ball and the Cross}}

Modified articles/quote-dave-barry-ketchup.poly.pm from [b1c20954] to [6f984634].

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◊; I have made no determination of copyright on this file’s contents.

◊(define-meta published "2010-04-29")

◊blockquote{“One thing that is not in my fridge is ketchup and mustard. You know why? Because you
don’t have to put them in the fridge! Too many Americans are putting cold ketchup on nice, hot
hamburgers. And I ask those Americans, When you go to the diner, where is the ketchup? Sitting out
on the table.”

◊footer{Dave Barry, ◊link[1]{profile in the ◊cite{New York Times}}}}

◊url[1]{https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/2010/05/02/magazine/02fob-domains-t.html}







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◊; I have made no determination of copyright on this file’s contents.

◊(define-meta published "2010-04-29")

◊blockquote{“One thing that is not in my fridge is ketchup and mustard. You know why? Because you
don’t have to put them in the fridge! Too many Americans are putting cold ketchup on nice, hot
hamburgers. And I ask those Americans, When you go to the diner, where is the ketchup? Sitting out
on the table.”}attrib{Dave Barry, ◊link[1]{profile in the ◊i{New York Times}}}

◊url[1]{https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/2010/05/02/magazine/02fob-domains-t.html}

Modified articles/quote-history-of-england.poly.pm from [39858a52] to [581fd128].

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◊blockquote{“◊caps{James I was} always boasting of his skill in what he called kingcraft; and
yet it is hardly possible even to imagine a course more directly opposed to all the rules of
kingcraft than that which he followed…he enraged and alarmed his Parliament by constantly telling
them that they held their privileges merely during his pleasure, and that they had no more business
to inquire what he might lawfully do than what the Deity might lawfully do…his cowardice, his
childishness, his pedantry, his ungainly person and manners, his provincial accent, made him an act
of derision…On the day of the accession of James the First our country descended from the rank she
had hitherto held, and began to be regarded as a power hardly of the second order.”

◊footer{Thomas Macaulay, ◊cite{History of England}.}}

◊note[#:date "2019-04-10"]{I had originally transcribed this quote alongside a link to ◊link[1]{a
New York Times piece} about the Dunning-Kruger effect:

◊blockquote{‘Dunning and Kruger argued in their paper, “When people are incompetent in the
strategies they adopt to achieve success and satisfaction, they suffer a dual burden: Not only do
they reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of







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◊blockquote{“◊caps{James I was} always boasting of his skill in what he called kingcraft; and
yet it is hardly possible even to imagine a course more directly opposed to all the rules of
kingcraft than that which he followed…he enraged and alarmed his Parliament by constantly telling
them that they held their privileges merely during his pleasure, and that they had no more business
to inquire what he might lawfully do than what the Deity might lawfully do…his cowardice, his
childishness, his pedantry, his ungainly person and manners, his provincial accent, made him an act
of derision…On the day of the accession of James the First our country descended from the rank she
had hitherto held, and began to be regarded as a power hardly of the second order.”}attrib{Thomas Macaulay, ◊i{History of England}.}

◊note[#:date "2019-04-10"]{I had originally transcribed this quote alongside a link to ◊link[1]{a
New York Times piece} about the Dunning-Kruger effect:

◊blockquote{‘Dunning and Kruger argued in their paper, “When people are incompetent in the
strategies they adopt to achieve success and satisfaction, they suffer a dual burden: Not only do
they reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of

Modified articles/quote-lewis-carrol-vertical.poly.pm from [f65e0462] to [1486c4b3].

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Often feared where I would be – 
Wondered where she’d yield her love
When I yield, so will she.
I would her will be pitied!
Cursed be love! She pitied me…}
◊attrib{Attributed to Lewis Carrol}



◊note[#:date "2011-03-25"]{This is a “◊index{square poem}”: it can be read vertically (first word of
each line, second word of each line, and so on) as well as horizontally.

◊blockquote{“One of Carroll’s most remarkable poems, if indeed he wrote it, ◊index[#:key "tenuous
paper trails"]{was first published} by Trevor Wakefield in his Lewis Carroll Circular, No.
2 (November 1974). The poem is quoted in a letter to The Daily Express (January 1, 1964) by a writer
who tells of a privately printed book titled Memoirs of Lady Ure. Lady Ure, it seems, quoted the
poem as one that Carroll wrote for her brother. Wakefield says that no one has yet located a copy of
Lady Ure’s Memoirs, but whether this is still true I do not know.” ◊footer{Martin Gardener,link[1]{◊cite{The Universe in a Handkerchief}, p. 20}}}}



◊url[1]{https://books.google.com/books?id=77kcKHmLZXIC&lpg=PA20&pg=PA20#v=onepage&q&f=false}







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Often feared where I would be – 
Wondered where she’d yield her love
When I yield, so will she.
I would her will be pitied!
Cursed be love! She pitied me…}
◊attrib{Attributed to Lewis Carrol}

◊note[#:date "2011-03-25"]{

This is a “◊index{square poem}”: it can be read vertically (first word of each line, second word of
each line, and so on) as well as horizontally.

◊blockquote{“One of Carroll’s most remarkable poems, if indeed he wrote it, ◊index[#:key "tenuous
paper trails"]{was first published} by Trevor Wakefield in his Lewis Carroll Circular, No.  2
(November 1974). The poem is quoted in a letter to The Daily Express (January 1, 1964) by a writer
who tells of a privately printed book titled Memoirs of Lady Ure. Lady Ure, it seems, quoted the
poem as one that Carroll wrote for her brother. Wakefield says that no one has yet located a copy of
Lady Ure’s Memoirs, but whether this is still true I do not know.”}attrib{Martin Gardener,◊link[1]{◊i{The Universe in a Handkerchief}, p. 20}}

}

◊url[1]{https://books.google.com/books?id=77kcKHmLZXIC&lpg=PA20&pg=PA20#v=onepage&q&f=false}