◊(Local Yarn Code "Check-in [078a4e03]")

Overview
Comment:Fix copyright, link in ‘Future Proofing’
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk | errata
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA3-256: 078a4e03291dffa270893e957e9ce9bf9e2554c95b05cbbe905d0f99905edcc6
User & Date: joel on 2020-03-15 18:27:04
Other Links: manifest | tags
Context
2020-03-15
18:33
Change system for managing series: remove from SQLite cache, manage as a hash table of structs instead. check-in: 71cdd100 user: joel tags: trunk
18:27
Fix copyright, link in ‘Future Proofing’ check-in: 078a4e03 user: joel tags: trunk, errata
03:09
Remove series from entry of 1 Jan 2003 check-in: 8f04c5f8 user: joel tags: trunk, errata
Changes

Modified articles/future-proofing.poly.pm from [693ce6b5] to [ff1f9fdf].

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#lang pollen

◊; Copyright 2020 by Joel Dueck. All Rights Reserved.

◊(define-meta published "2020-03-08")

◊title{Future Proofing}

Thing that’s been on my mind lately: if you want your blog posts or your photographs to be around
fifty years from now, you need to print them out. And the best format for that printout is a bound
book. And if you care about your stuff being around ◊em{after you die}, you’ll print lots of copies
and distribute them to anyone who might be persuaded to take one of them.
................................................................................
Prize-nominated feature in one of the nation’s oldest newspapers can disappear from the web,
anything can. “There are now no passive means of preserving digital information,” said Abby Rumsey,
a writer and digital historian. In other words if you want to save something online, you have to
decide to save it. Ephemerality is built into the very architecture of the web, which was intended
to be a messaging system, not a library.

◊footer{Adrienne LaFrance, ◊link['rtw]{Raiders of the Lost Web}}

}

I can envision only one sort-of-practical way the web can be “preserved” in any meaningful sense of
the word: a giant microfiche archive with a card index. Yes, it would be inconvenient to use. It’s
also the only option likely to be useable at all in 100 years.

}


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#lang pollen

◊; Copyright 2015 by Joel Dueck. All Rights Reserved.

◊(define-meta published "2015-03-24")

◊title{Future Proofing}

Thing that’s been on my mind lately: if you want your blog posts or your photographs to be around
fifty years from now, you need to print them out. And the best format for that printout is a bound
book. And if you care about your stuff being around ◊em{after you die}, you’ll print lots of copies
and distribute them to anyone who might be persuaded to take one of them.
................................................................................
Prize-nominated feature in one of the nation’s oldest newspapers can disappear from the web,
anything can. “There are now no passive means of preserving digital information,” said Abby Rumsey,
a writer and digital historian. In other words if you want to save something online, you have to
decide to save it. Ephemerality is built into the very architecture of the web, which was intended
to be a messaging system, not a library.

◊footer{Adrienne LaFrance, ◊link['rtw]{Raiders of the Lost Web}}
◊url['rtw]{http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/10/raiders-of-the-lost-web/409210/}
}

I can envision only one sort-of-practical way the web can be “preserved” in any meaningful sense of
the word: a giant microfiche archive with a card index. Yes, it would be inconvenient to use. It’s
also the only option likely to be useable at all in 100 years.

}